Replacing M-Audio Microtrack battery

How to replace the battery in an M-Audio Microtrack and Microtrack 2

For a more detailed article with photos, visit: http://www.natureguystudio.com/microtrackbattery.html

It will happen sooner or later, your battery in your M-Audio Microtrack 24/96 recorder will go bad. You have a few options. You could buy another one, return it to M-Audio and have them replace the battery for around $150, or you can replace it yourself for under $10. This article will tell you how to replace the battery yourself. If you are careful, are fairly skilled, and can solder, you should be able to replace the battery.

If your M-Audio Microtrack is dead and it won’t power up, first try to recharge the unit for a few hours to see if the display will power up. If that doesn’t work, press the power and delete key at the same time for a few seconds to reset and reboot the firmware. Ideally, you should open the case and check the battery and make sure charging circuit works before you buy a battery. Read the entire article and read how to check the battery before you buy a battery.

Ready to replace that battery? Here is what you will need: a small flat bladed screwdriver and or some plastic case openers, a small philips screwdriver, a soldering iron and solder, a replacement battery (see below), and two inches of double stick tape or some adhesive RTV.

The battery from M-Audio Microtrack is a 3.7Volt, 1200mAhr, prismatic, Lithium battery. The size is: 60mm x 51mm x 4.6mm. A very common replacement battery that will fit is a battery from an original iPhone, which is 1400mAhr. Batteries from the iPhone 3G or 4G will not fit. The iPhone 2G battery is available from numerous sources on eBay for around $6.00 including shipping. The battery usually comes with an installation kit of plastic case openers and some star and philips drivers.

First, remove the compact flash card. Place the unit on an open surface and use a ground strap or touch a ground source to eliminate any static charge on your body from damaging the electronics inside the Microtrack. Continue to ground yourself while working on the battery replacement.

Next, open the back cover. This is the most difficult part. Take your time and take it easy or you can ruin the plastic cover. Place your sharp, small, flat bladed screwdriver at the corner of the case and push in and lever outwards. You may also try the plastic case openers that came with your replacement battery kit. The four corners open outwards. There are three catches along the midsection, where the flash card inserts and the opposite side, that should be levered inwards as your screwdriver is inserted. It will take a little time to gradually open the case. You may have to place additional screwdrivers at the latch points to keep the case from popping back together. You may leave some marks in the case plastic. That is ok, but try not to break the latches or the case may not close back together well. Remove and place the cover on your bench.

Remember to ground yourself or wear a grounding strap before touching the PC Board! Next, carefully lift the old battery from the PC Board. It has double stick tape holding it to the board. Now, remove two small philips screws holding down the PC Board. Put the small screws in a safe place so you don’t loose them. Carefully lift the PC Board. It will be retained by the end pieces of the case. You don’t need to completely remove the board, but you do need to lift away the end panel where the line out and S/PDIF RCA connectors are located to get to the battery wires.

You can check your battery voltage to see if is dead. Anything around one volt and the thing is dead. Check the voltage at the battery wires while a charger is plugged in. You will want to see around 4 to 5 volts. That will tell you that it is trying to charge and the charging circuit is working.

Now, you will replace the battery, and how you do this may depend on the battery you get. Do not touch the two battery wires together. It will short the battery out and may cause damage. Basically, connect the red wire where the red wire came from and the black wire where the black wire came from. Leave the white wire disconnected, since it is not used in the M-Audio unit, and be sure to tape over it and to the battery so it is electrically isolated. Your wires may be long enough to solder them to the board or, like mine, they may be short, and require splicing with the wires from the old battery. I used heat shrink tubing on my splice or you can use electrical tape or silicon RTV to insulate the wires. Apply some electrical tape or RTV to cover where the battery wires attach to the PC Board. It looks like the positive lead could almost touch ground if left uncovered.

Next, reassemble the end panel and PC Board with the small screws. Route the wires and placement of the battery so that the battery wires are routed around the battery and away from the case closure snaps. Apply a piece of double stick tape or RTV to the back of the battery and attach it to the PC Board. Then snap the back cover back on. Plug that charger or USB cable in and let the unit fully charge. You should immediately see the screen display working once the new battery is installed since the replacement battery is semi-charged.

Your done! That was easy and you saved yourself a bunch of money. Your new battery will probably give you a little bit better run time.

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8 thoughts on “Replacing M-Audio Microtrack battery”

  1. My battery installation was even simpler. I didn’t need to remove screws from the PC board. I just pulled the old battery off, snipped off the two leads at the battery, and soldered them to the replacement battery leads. The latter were short, and the old leads were necessary for the wires to reach. Soldering wire-to-wire, away from both circuit board and battery, is surely safer as well.

    I ordered my *original* iPhone replacement battery from Hong Kong on eBay for under $4 (but be ready to wait 3 weeks or more for it to arrive). The replacement procedure was a lot easier than I thought it would be. And, yes, the hardest part *was* removing the cover.

  2. Many thanks! I never would have dared to replace the battery on my own, without this article, and the store where I bought the Microtrack II said it was not worthwhile any more. Many thanks again,

    Clemens Boon

  3. Hi!

    I replaced my microtrack battery with an old Iphone battery at 3.7V and 1400mAh. I used the techniques that are on the net and cross referenced different approaches and used the simplest one. I spliced the terminal cables together and my microtrack STILL wont power up or respond to anything. Can anyone help me with any information or has anyone else changed a battery that is compatible and still not had the device respond?

  4. I am sorry you had trouble. Check and make sure you made all the connections correctly first. Measure the voltage at the battery to make sure you have voltage and at the right polarity. A Microtrack usually will not power up or show anything on the screen until a battery is somewhat charged, and that may take an hour of charging. You might want to connect the charger to the unit and again measure the battery to make sure it is actually charging. You may have further trouble with the Microtrack or maybe the battery is bad. Either way, it will take some careful troubleshooting.

  5. Thanks for this, I was about to throw my M-Audio Microtrack to the trash, when I thought about looking for ways to save it, 5$ battery and it is fine now. I also simply did what Art Hunkins did, it works great. David

  6. I did this battery replacement and it worked great. A possibly related issue cropped up though. There is a lot of feedback-like noise in the right stereo channel when I use the t-mic that came with it. If I pull the t-mic out one segment then I get a proper stereo recording with the correct levels and no noise! Haven’t tested with other microphones because I don’t have any stereo microphones besides the t-mic that came with it.

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